Update to SOLE Model reflections

September 22, 2014

I have updated the SOLE Model website with a reflection on some staff development guidance offered by London Metropolitan University on their eMatrix website. They were kind enough to list the SOLE Model as one of four models for conceptualising distance and blended learning. It’s a privilege to be listed alongside Professors Terry Anderson and Randy Garrison’s ‘Community of Inquiry’, Professor Diana Laurillard’s ‘Conversational Framework’ and Professor Gilly Salmon’s ‘5 Step Model’.

I stated:

“What is clear is that to have a theoretical framework for effective on-line learning design is essential. I may have deviated from Anderson and Garrison’s separation from the social and cognitive processes, and from Salmon’s stress for human socialisation but the SOLE Model does allow for the personal, communitarian and societal dimension to learning. I also differ from Laurillard’s sequenced activity designs that result from the conversational framework into a more ‘freeform’ learning design at the theoretical level but the toolkit development will hopefully include further structural aspects in the near future. Learning and teaching online (distance or ‘blended’) presents unique challenges for teachers and students alike. Personally I advocate transparency to design for the student by sharing the design as an advanced organiser (SOLE Toolkit) in order to express clarity of the learning process (dialogue) and to encourage interaction and feedback leading to enhancement. Whichever way you look at it, it is privilege to find the SOLE Model included in such illustrious company.”
LondonMet eMatrix Web Resource

LondonMet eMatrix Web Resource


DEANZ 2010

May 9, 2010

DEANZ 2010 – Quality Connections – Boundless Possibilities: Through Open, Flexible and Distance Learning.

I’m biased because I played a minor role of the Organising Committee but I have to say this was one of the most enjoyable conference I have been to in many a year. Te Papa was a great venue, and the conference (25-28 April 2010) was fairly fast-paced, well punctuated with some quality keynotes and plenaries and a rather amusing ‘Great Debate’. The personal highight for me was the keynote by Professor Terry Anderson

Anderson, T. (2010) Three Generations of Distance Education Pedagogy [PowerPoint]. Retrieved May 2, 2010 from http://cider.athabascau.ca/CIDERSessions/sessionarchive/

In this presentation Terry defines three pedagogical models that have defined distance education programming – behavioural/cognitive, constructivist and connectivist. He talks about the challenges and opportunity afforded by each model, with a focus on the emergent development of connectivism.

A fascinating review of developments in the field that illustrated clearly the ongoing tension between central institutional ‘control’ of enabling technologies and the ‘license and liberty’ that we increasingly hope students will exercise.

My own small contribution was as leader of the winning debate team ! Humble in victory as ever…..

Simon welcomes the win decision at the Great Debate

Humble in Victory: the win decision at the Great Debate


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